STRANGE (BUT TRUE) DRIVING LAWS

Written by Carrie Mae


Just when you thought it couldn't get any more difficult or challenging to drive our local streets (which is why you need the experienced instructors at Drive Rite Academy to lead you through the pitfalls!), check out some of the stranger driving laws around the country.
In our neck of the woods (the Northeast), there are some real doozies. For instance, in New York, it’s against the law to disrobe in your car in Sag Harbor. And in New Jersey, frowning at a police officer is against the law (really?). And in Pennsylvania, if you're driving on a country road at night, you must stop every mile and set off flares and then allow 10 minutes for livestock to clear the road.
The South has its own weirdness. In Florida, for example, you must feed the parking meter if you tie an elephant, goat or alligator to it. In Louisiana, a woman’s husband must, by law, wave a flag in front of her car before she can drive it (that would go over big in New York!). And in Kentucky, you must never allow your pet to molest a vehicle in Fort Thomas.
On the West Coast, it’s against the law for women to drive in a housecoat in California. And, in Oregon, motorists must yield to pedestrians when driving on the sidewalk (good law!). And, in Nevada, it's against the law to ride a camel on the highway.
How about Alaska? Well, in the 50th state, it’s illegal to tie a dog to your car roof. And in Hawaii, it's against the law for a vehicle in motion to flash its hazard lights.
And Washington has a unique driving statute on its books. By law, any driver with criminal intentions must stop at the city limits and call the chief of police as he enters the town (seems like a good way to deter crime!).
Believe it or not!
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